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On one hand, it referred to the New Land which robbed early immigrants of their culture, their language, sometimes their families and their fortunes. I recently read that New York area firefighters are training at The Concord by purposely setting rooms ablaze! ) So a "chai-nik" is the thing into which the tea is put.But the expression was also used as an an interjection, expressing admiration for the wonders, joys, possibilities of America. "Nik" is a suffix which turns the root word into a new word generally meaning "one who does [the root word]" This ending is used often to create Yinglish words such as " was defined as a "teacup" (a small piece of china).People without manners would bang a spoon around in the teacup while they were stirring and then clatter it down on the saucer when done, creating a lot of annoying, unnecessary, rude noise, apparently much like my sisters and I made a lot of rude, unnecessary, and annoying noise on occasion.My bubby (from Warsaw, not Kishev) wouldn't have known from chai if it was slopped on her." itz) Anything not kosher for Passover; i.e.

Which reminds me of joke: Ruthie marries Moishe, a very religious but sexually inexperienced young man. - Judge Judy uses this one all the time, and in fact it's the title of one of her books) "Don't pee on my foot and tell me it's raining! Folg mikh a gayng: literally means, "follow me on my path/my way" or "that's quite a long way" but colloquially means "that's no small task! Many a man has held this over a woman's head on spite or as a negotiating tool in civil court for custody or alimony. Golem: A Jewish folk character -- an animate creature created out of inanimate material (the way God created Adam,) who acts as a rescuer or savior.

Before WWII, Yiddish was spoken by more than 11 million people.

Today, it is spoken by perhaps one tenth that many.

If no guide is given, it's pronounced as it looks.)Note, too, that Yiddish is actually written with Hebrew letters, therefore, when used in English, words are transliterated, or spelled as they sound (as we write Chinese or Arabic words in English.) Since Yiddish was spoken by Jews all over Europe, accents and inflexions varied greatly. For example, "ferdrayed" is the same as "fardrayed" is the same as "tsedrayd" etc. It's totally Italian, but for some reason many people seem to think it's Yiddish and have asked me what it means. "If my grandmother had balls, she'd be my grandfather.") It's the more sarcastic equivalent of the English expression "..if I had wings, I would fly." (A less "blue" version is "If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a trolley car.") Billig: cheap, inexpensive.

"Sh" words are often spelled with an "sch" and words which end in "er" might also be spelled with an "eh" "ah" etc. If you're looking it up here, know that it's not Yiddish, but I'm going to tell you what it means, anyway, because hey, that's the kind of girl I am: agitation, stress, heartburn, acid stomach, the gastro-intestinal manifestations of stress. My great-grandmother used to say "billig es teier" (teier = expensive, dear, pricey) meaning cheap things are actually expensive in the long run, because they fall apart or break, whereas "when you buy good, you have forever." !

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If you don't see it in the glossary, try spelling it slightly differently (i.e. I'm happy to help where I can, but please do not attempt to use me as a free translation or editing service!